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Coca-Cola is accused of reverse racism for sharing a video encourages employees to be ‘less white’ 

Coca-Cola is under fire for uploading a resource video encouraging employees to ‘be less white’.  

Slides from the video went viral on social media late last week after they were shared by a ‘whistleblower’ working for the soft drink giant. 

Many have now accused Coca-Cola of encouraging reverse racism, and are urging employees to file discrimination lawsuits against the company. 

The slides appear to come from an 11-minute video titled ‘Confronting Racism with Robin DiAngelo’.  

DiAngelo, a white author and consultant, argues that even well-meaning white people are complicit in racist structures unless they actively work to be ‘anti-racist’.  

Coca-Cola is under fire for uploading a resource video encouraging employees to ‘be less white’. Slides from the ‘inclusive workplace’ video went viral on social media over the weekend after they were shared by a ‘whistleblower’ working for the soft drink giant

The slides appear to come from an 11-minute video titled 'Confronting Racism with Robin DiAngelo'. One slide claims that whiteness is associated with arrogance, defensiveness, ignorance and a lack of humility

The slides appear to come from an 11-minute video titled ‘Confronting Racism with Robin DiAngelo’. One slide claims that whiteness is associated with arrogance, defensiveness, ignorance and a lack of humility

The Coca-Cola logo can be seen in the top right of the screenshot. The company has confirmed that it uploaded the video to their 'LinkedIn Learning platform', but insists it is not a part of the company's compulsory curriculum

The Coca-Cola logo can be seen in the top right of the screenshot. The company has confirmed that it uploaded the video to their ‘LinkedIn Learning platform’, but insists it is not a part of the company’s compulsory curriculum

A spokesperson told The Washington Examiner that the video was accessible to Coca-Cola employees as part of their 'Better Together global training', which is designed 'to help build an inclusive workplace'

A spokesperson told The Washington Examiner that the video was accessible to Coca-Cola employees as part of their ‘Better Together global training’, which is designed ‘to help build an inclusive workplace’

One of the slides features the title ‘Try to Be Less White’, before another claims that whiteness is associated with arrogance, defensiveness, ignorance and a lack of humility. 

Another slide states: ‘In the US and other Western nations, white people are socialized to feel that they are inherently superior because they are white’.

It continues: ‘Research shows that by age 3 to 4, children understand that it is better to be white.’ 

DiAngelo is the author of the book ‘White Fragility: Why It’s So Hard For White People To Talk About Racism’. 

‘I grew up poor and white. While my class oppression has been relatively visible to me, my race privilege has not,’ she says of herself. 

‘In my efforts to uncover how race has shaped my life, I have gained deeper insight by placing race in the center of my analysis and asking how each of my other group locations have socialized me to collude with racism.’

Coca-Cola has confirmed that it uploaded the video to their ‘LinkedIn Learning platform’, but insist it is not a part of the company’s compulsory curriculum.  

A spokesperson told The Washington Examiner that the video was accessible to Coca-Cola employees as part of its ‘Better Together global training’, which is designed ‘to help build an inclusive workplace.’   

‘The video in question was accessible on the LinkedIn Learning platform but was not part of the company’s curriculum. We will continue to listen to our employees and refine our learning programs as appropriate,’ the spokesperson stated. 

Coca-Cola's headquarters in Atlanta is pictured. A company spokesperson stated: 'We will continue to listen to our employees and refine our learning programs as appropriate'

Coca-Cola’s headquarters in Atlanta is pictured. A company spokesperson stated: ‘We will continue to listen to our employees and refine our learning programs as appropriate’

The slides appear to come from an 11-minute video titled 'Confronting Racism with Robin DiAngelo'. DiAngelo, an author and consultant, argues that even well-meaning white people are complicit in racist structures unless they actively work to be 'anti-racist'

The slides appear to come from an 11-minute video titled ‘Confronting Racism with Robin DiAngelo’. DiAngelo, an author and consultant, argues that even well-meaning white people are complicit in racist structures unless they actively work to be ‘anti-racist’

The slides were re-tweeted by Harmeet K. Dhillon, a leader of the Republican National Committee in California. 

‘This seems like blatant racial discrimination to this employment lawyer,’ she stated. 

Another concurred, writing: ‘This is a gold mine for any decent civil rights lawyer. Where are the lawsuits??’

A third popular tweet simply stated: ‘I always preferred Pepsi’. 

However, some argued that they still supported workplace initiatives to teach employees about diversity and racial sensitivity. 

‘I think the word choice is poor, but the concepts will hopefully be enlightening. There are many who do not realize their own racial prejudices, and I’m not kidding,’ a proponent tweeted. 

The slides were re-tweeted by Harmeet K. Dhillon, a leader of the Republican National Committee in California

The slides were re-tweeted by Harmeet K. Dhillon, a leader of the Republican National Committee in California


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